USE

SYNTHROID® (levothyroxine sodium tablets, USP) is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism, except in cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life.

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

Thyroid hormones, including SYNTHROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of SYNTHROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.


APPROXIMATELY ONE IN EIGHT
WOMEN BETWEEN THE AGES OF
35 AND 65 HAS HYPOTHYROIDISM.*

MILLIONS OF AMERICANS
ARE LIVING WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM

Millions of people have hypothyroidism, and many are undiagnosed. Both women and men can develop hypothyroidism, but it is more common among women. In fact, women are five times more likely than men to suffer from hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a lifelong condition that can occur at any age.


*Garber JR, ed. Thyroid disease: understanding hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Boston, MA: Harvard Health Publications, 2004.

WHAT IS HYPOTHYROIDISM?

Before understanding what hypothyroidism is, it helps to know what the thyroid is and how it works. The thyroid is a gland in the lower front of the neck, just below the Adam’s apple. Think of it as the body’s thermostat. It impacts many parts of the body—the muscles, bones, skin, heart, brain, liver, kidneys, digestive tract, and more.

Hypothyroidism is when the thyroid doesn’t make enough thyroid hormone called thyroxine, which causes the body’s system to slow down. Different parts of the body can be affected by hypothyroidism, which can cause symptoms like tiredness, feeling cold, dry skin, and hair loss. The number one cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes the thyroid to become inflamed and unable to produce enough thyroid hormone.


However, if the thyroid makes too much thyroid hormone, it is called hyperthyroidism, which causes the body’s system to speed up. Hyperthyroidism can also affect different areas in the body, and cause a person to experience a separate set of symptoms.


IF YOUR THYROID GLAND ISN'T WORKING PROPERLY, TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE

TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE IN MANAGING HYPOTHYROIDISM

Hypothyroidism is a lifelong condition that requires partnering with your doctor to create a care plan that’s right for you. Remember, whether you’ve just been diagnosed and are starting medication, or have been taking medication, you play an important role in managing your hypothyroidism.

It helps to know that you have people on your side, like your doctors, nurses, and pharmacists. It also helps to reach out to your friends and family, and to others who are living with hypothyroidism.

VIDEO GALLERY

DR LEVY EXPLAINS HYPOTHYROIDISM AND WHAT CAUSES IT

Learn more about hypothyroidism, the causes, and who may be at risk for it.

Use

SYNTHROID® (levothyroxine sodium tablets, USP) is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism, except in cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life.

Important Safety Information

  • Thyroid hormones, including SYNTHROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of SYNTHROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

  • Do not use SYNTHROID if you have hyperthyroidism or over-active thyroid, uncorrected adrenal problems, are having symptoms of a heart attack, or are allergic to any of its ingredients.

  • In women, long-term treatment with SYNTHROID has been associated with increased bone loss, especially in women who are on high doses or those who are on high doses after menopause.

  • Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, are breast-feeding or are taking any other drugs, as well as prescription and over-the-counter products.

  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking SYNTHROID. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes. If you are taking blood thinners, your blood clotting status should be checked often.

  • Use SYNTHROID only as ordered by your doctor. Do not stop or change the amount you take, or how often you take it, unless told to do so by your doctor.

  • Products such as iron and calcium supplements and antacids can lower your body’s ability to absorb SYNTHROID, so SYNTHROID should be taken 4 hours before or after taking these products.

  • Take SYNTHROID as a single dose, preferably on an empty stomach, one-half to one hour before breakfast. Your body’s ability to absorb SYNTHROID is improved when you take it on an empty stomach.

  • Tell your doctor if you develop any of the following symptoms: rapid or abnormal heartbeat, chest pain, difficulty catching breath, leg cramps, headache, feeling nervous, irritability, sleeplessness, shaking, change in appetite, weight gain or loss, throwing up, diarrhea, increased sweating, unable to tolerate heat, fever, changes in menstrual periods, swollen red bumps on the skin or skin rash, or any other unusual medical event.

  • Tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking SYNTHROID before any surgery.

  • Once your body’s response to SYNTHROID has stabilized, it is important to have lab tests done, as ordered by your doctor, at least once a year.

This is the most important safety information you should know about SYNTHROID. For more information, talk with your doctor.

SYNTHROID TABLETS ARE A PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

Coming soon!
Our very own YouTube Channel, where you can watch other people's stories with hypothyroidism.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

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Use

SYNTHROID® (levothyroxine sodium tablets, USP) is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism, except in cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life.

Important Safety Information

  • Thyroid hormones, including SYNTHROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of SYNTHROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

  • Do not use SYNTHROID if you have hyperthyroidism or over-active thyroid, uncorrected adrenal problems, are having symptoms of a heart attack, or are allergic to any of its ingredients.

  • In women, long-term treatment with SYNTHROID has been associated with increased bone loss, especially in women who are on high doses or those who are on high doses after menopause.

  • Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, are breast-feeding or are taking any other drugs, as well as prescription and over-the-counter products.

  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking SYNTHROID. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes. If you are taking blood thinners, your blood clotting status should be checked often.

  • Use SYNTHROID only as ordered by your doctor. Do not stop or change the amount you take, or how often you take it, unless told to do so by your doctor.

  • Products such as iron and calcium supplements and antacids can lower your body’s ability to absorb SYNTHROID, so SYNTHROID should be taken 4 hours before or after taking these products.

  • Take SYNTHROID as a single dose, preferably on an empty stomach, one-half to one hour before breakfast. Your body’s ability to absorb SYNTHROID is improved when you take it on an empty stomach.

  • Tell your doctor if you develop any of the following symptoms: rapid or abnormal heartbeat, chest pain, difficulty catching breath, leg cramps, headache, feeling nervous, irritability, sleeplessness, shaking, change in appetite, weight gain or loss, throwing up, diarrhea, increased sweating, unable to tolerate heat, fever, changes in menstrual periods, swollen red bumps on the skin or skin rash, or any other unusual medical event.

  • Tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking SYNTHROID before any surgery.

  • Once your body’s response to SYNTHROID has stabilized, it is important to have lab tests done, as ordered by your doctor, at least once a year.

This is the most important safety information you should know about SYNTHROID. For more information, talk with your doctor.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.