USE: SYNTHROID® (levothyroxine sodium) tablets, USP

for oral use is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism. It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life. SYNTHROID should not be used to treat noncancerous growths or enlargement of the thyroid in patients with normal iodine levels, or in cases of temporary hypothyroidism caused by inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Thyroid hormones, including SYNTHROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of SYNTHROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

  • Do not use SYNTHROID if you have uncorrected adrenal problems.

  • Taking too much levothyroxine has been associated with increased bone loss, especially in women after menopause.

  • Once your doctor has found your specific SYNTHROID dose, it is important to have lab tests done, as ordered by your doctor, at least once a year.

  • Foods like soybean flour, cottonseed meal, walnuts, and dietary fiber may cause your body to absorb less SYNTHROID from the gastrointestinal tract. Grapefruit juice may cause your body to absorb less levothyroxine and may reduce its effect. Let your doctor know if you eat these foods, as your dose of SYNTHROID may need to be adjusted.

  • Use SYNTHROID only as ordered by your doctor. Take SYNTHROID as a single dose, preferably on an empty stomach, one-half to one hour before breakfast.

  • Products such as iron and calcium supplements and antacids can lower your body’s ability to absorb levothyroxine, so SYNTHROID should be taken 4 hours before or after taking these products.

  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or are thinking of becoming pregnant while taking SYNTHROID. Your dose of SYNTHROID may need to be increased during your pregnancy.

  • It may take several weeks before you notice an improvement in your symptoms.

  • Tell your doctor if you are taking any other drugs, including prescription and over-the-counter products.

  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking SYNTHROID. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor, and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes. If you are taking blood thinners, your blood clotting status should be checked often.

  • Tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking SYNTHROID before any surgery.

  • Tell your doctor if you develop any of the following symptoms: rapid or abnormal heartbeat, chest pain, difficulty catching your breath, leg cramps, headache, nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness, shaking, change in appetite, weight gain or loss, vomiting, diarrhea, increased sweating, difficulty tolerating heat, fever, changes in menstrual periods, swollen red bumps on the skin (hives) or skin rash, or any other unusual medical event.

  • Partial hair loss may occur during the first few months you are taking SYNTHROID.

This is the most important safety information you should know about SYNTHROID. For more information, talk with your doctor.

Click here for full Prescribing Information or go to http://www.rxabbvie.com/pdf/synthroid.pdf.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

1 in 3 people who think they’re taking Synthroid, aren’t

1 IN 3 PEOPLE WHO THINK THEY’RE TAKING SYNTHROID, AREN’T

Make sure you’re getting the Synthroid your doctor prescribed.

Precise Dosing
Options

Managing hypothyroidism includes getting a precise dose of medicine day after day. This is because levothyroxine products, including Synthroid, are narrow therapeutic index (NTI) drugs. If your dose is off even a little bit, you could experience symptoms of over‑treatment (too much medicine) or under‑treatment (too little medicine).

Get what your doctor INTENDED

The Food and Drug Administration has determined that certain levothyroxine products are interchangeable.
The FDA has determined that drugs that are classified as interchangeable can be substituted at the pharmacy. A levothyroxine product that is not interchangeable with Synthroid might not have the exact same effect on your TSH as Synthroid.

IF YOUR DOCTOR DOESN’T NOTE “DISPENSE AS WRITTEN” (DAW) ON YOUR PRESCRIPTION,

you may get a generic levothyroxine medication instead of Synthroid, like the scenario below. In these cases, you may pay more at the pharmacy if you have to ask for Synthroid.

If your doctor doesn’t protect your prescription with “Dispense As Written (DAW)” you may not get  Synthroid every time you refill your prescription
A generic levothyroxine medication could be substituted for Synthroid if your doctor doesn’t write “Dispense as Written (DAW)” on your prescription

Refill 1

INTERCHANGEABLE

A generic levothyroxine medication could be substituted for Synthroid if your doctor doesn’t write “Dispense as Written (DAW)” on your prescription

Refill 2

INTERCHANGEABLE

A generic levothyroxine medication could be substituted for Synthroid if your doctor doesn’t write “Dispense as Written (DAW)” on your prescription

Refill 3

INTERCHANGEABLE

A generic levothyroxine medication could be substituted for Synthroid if your doctor doesn’t write “Dispense as Written (DAW)” on your prescription

Refill 4

NOT INTERCHANGEABLE

Refill 4 represents a generic levothyroxine medication that is interchangeable with another generic, like Refill 3, but is NOT interchangeable with Synthroid. This medication might not have the exact same effect on your TSH as Synthroid.

This example may not happen in some states.

If your doctor chooses Synthroid, ask that he/she writes "DAW" on your prescription,

indicating “brand name” medication is necessary. That way you'll pay the lower cost for Synthroid at the pharmacy.

If your doctor chooses Synthroid and writes “Dispense as Written (DAW)” on your prescription, you will get the right dose every time.
If your doctor chooses Synthroid, ask that he/she writes "DAW" on your prescription.

Refill 1

If your doctor chooses Synthroid, ask that he/she writes "DAW" on your prescription.

Refill 2

If your doctor chooses Synthroid, ask that he/she writes "DAW" on your prescription.

Refill 3

If your doctor chooses Synthroid, ask that he/she writes "DAW" on your prescription.

Refill 4

Tablets shown not actual size and may not represent exact color.

Your doctor may write “Dispense as Written” (DAW), or your state’s required language, on your prescription.

Check your pill

Remember, you worked closely with your doctor to find the Synthroid dose that works for you. So make sure you’re getting the Synthroid that your doctor prefers to manage your hypothyroidism.

Next time you’re at the pharmacy, check your pills to make sure you’re getting Synthroid as your doctor prefers. Know what your pill looks like. Does your pill say “SYNTHROID”? If your pill doesn’t say “SYNTHROID,” speak up. Be clear about your doctor’s preference for Synthroid. When you call in for your refill, let the pharmacist know that your doctor prefers Synthroid.

The Food and Drug Administration has determined that certain levothyroxine products are interchangeable.
The FDA has determined that drugs that are classified as interchangeable can be substituted at the pharmacy. A levothyroxine product that is not interchangeable with Synthroid might not have the exact same effect on your TSH as Synthroid.

With your first
prescription and
at every refill:

Be sure to ask for brand name Synthroid at the pharmacy if you or your doctor prefer Synthroid.

ASK FOR BRAND NAME SYNTHROID AT THE PHARMACY IF YOU OR YOUR DOCTOR PREFER SYNTHROID

Call ahead to the pharmacy to ask if they filled with brand name Synthroid. Whether you’re at the pharmacy or ordering via mail-order service, make sure you specify you want the Synthroid your doctor prescribed.

Check your pill for the name “SYNTHROID” before leaving the pharmacy

CHECK YOUR PILL FOR THE NAME “SYNTHROID”

Generics may come in the same color and shape as Synthroid, which can be confusing. Before leaving the pharmacy, check your pill to make sure it says “SYNTHROID.” Remember, only Synthroid has the name “SYNTHROID” embossed on every pill.

Check your pill for the correct dosage strength. If the pill bottle doesn’t indicate the right dosage, then it’s not your dosage

CHECK YOUR PILL FOR THE DOSAGE STRENGTH

If your pill or bottle doesn’t indicate the right dosage strength, it’s not your dose.

Speak up if it’s not Synthroid and ask your pharmacist to refill the prescription with the Synthroid brand your doctor prescribed

SPEAK UP IF IT’S NOT SYNTHROID

If it’s not Synthroid, be sure to ask your pharmacist to refill your prescription with the Synthroid brand your doctor prescribed.

Be sure the pharmacist or mail-order service notes your doctor’s preference

BE SURE THE PHARMACIST OR MAIL-ORDER SERVICE NOTES YOUR doctor’s PREFERENCE

If your doctor’s preference for Synthroid is noted in your record, it's more likely you’ll get the Synthroid your doctor prescribed in future refills.

Check the pill bottle for the name “AbbVie”

Check the Pill Bottle

Check the label on your bottle carefully. If you look closely, it may say “generic for Synthroid,” which means it's not Synthroid. If the pill bottle says manufactured by “AbbVie,” you know it's Synthroid.

VIDEO GALLERY

DR SEIBEL SUGGESTS THAT PATIENTS DOUBLE-CHECK THEIR PILLS

Learn tips on making sure the pharmacist gives you Synthroid every time you fill a prescription.

DR ROSENTHAL ON
HOW TO MAKE SURE
IT'S SYNTHROID

Dr Rosenthal shares his steps for helping ensure his patients get the medication he prescribed.

ELISA AND TRACY ON WHY YOU SHOULD MAKE SURE YOU’RE GETTING SYNTHROID

Learn how to check your pills and talk to the pharmacist to make sure you get exactly what your doctor prescribed.

Story Gallery

Click to read more on Wendy checking her pill

Wendy on checking
her pill

At the age of 38, I have been seeing the same doctor for a few years now, and his office has it clearly marked in my records that my doctor prefers Synthroid. I check...
that each prescription/renewal says “Synthroid” as my doctor prefers. They are very good about specifying “Synthroid” clearly on each prescription written. I also have a great relationship with my local pharmacy and they also have it clearly marked in my records. I make sure to check my pill bottle and the actual pills before leaving the pharmacy, just to make sure. I know to look for a pink pill that’s 200 mcg dosage and that’s stamped with the dosage and the “SYNTHROID” name on the pill. I also check the manufacturer on the bottle to make sure it says AbbVie.
–Wendy
The Food and Drug Administration has determined that certain levothyroxine products are interchangeable.
The FDA has determined that drugs that are classified as interchangeable can be substituted at the pharmacy. A levothyroxine product that is not interchangeable with Synthroid might not have the exact same effect on your TSH as Synthroid.

Read More

Click to expand
Click to read more about how Laura ensures she gets Synthroid

Laura on making sure she gets Synthroid

To make sure I’m getting the Synthroid my doctor prescribed, I always open the bottle and look...
at the pills when I pick it up. I know what color pill I take currently, and I look for the actual name “SYNTHROID” on my pill.
–Laura
The Food and Drug Administration has determined that certain levothyroxine products are interchangeable.
The FDA has determined that drugs that are classified as interchangeable can be substituted at the pharmacy. A levothyroxine product that is not interchangeable with Synthroid might not have the exact same effect on your TSH as Synthroid.

Read More

Click to expand

USE

SYNTHROID® (levothyroxine sodium) tablets, for oral use is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism. It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life. SYNTHROID should not be used to treat noncancerous growths or enlargement of the thyroid in patients with normal iodine levels, or in cases of temporary hypothyroidism caused by inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Thyroid hormones, including SYNTHROID, should not be used either alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of obesity or weight loss. In patients with normal thyroid levels, doses of SYNTHROID used daily for hormone replacement are not helpful for weight loss. Larger doses may result in serious or even life-threatening events, especially when used in combination with certain other drugs used to reduce appetite.

  • Do not use SYNTHROID if you have uncorrected adrenal problems.

  • Taking too much levothyroxine has been associated with increased bone loss, especially in women after menopause.

  • Once your doctor has found your specific SYNTHROID dose, it is important to have lab tests done, as ordered by your doctor, at least once a year.

  • Foods like soybean flour, cottonseed meal, walnuts, and dietary fiber may cause your body to absorb less SYNTHROID from the gastrointestinal tract. Grapefruit juice may cause your body to absorb less levothyroxine and may reduce its effect. Let your doctor know if you eat these foods, as your dose of SYNTHROID may need to be adjusted.

  • Use SYNTHROID only as ordered by your doctor. Take SYNTHROID as a single dose, preferably on an empty stomach, one-half to one hour before breakfast.

  • Products such as iron and calcium supplements and antacids can lower your body’s ability to absorb levothyroxine, so SYNTHROID should be taken 4 hours before or after taking these products.

  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or are thinking of becoming pregnant while taking SYNTHROID. Your dose of SYNTHROID may need to be increased during your pregnancy.

  • It may take several weeks before you notice an improvement in your symptoms.

  • Tell your doctor if you are taking any other drugs, including prescription and over-the-counter products.

  • Tell your doctor about any other medical conditions you may have, especially heart disease, diabetes, blood clotting problems, and adrenal or pituitary gland problems. The dose of other drugs you may be taking to control these conditions may have to be changed while you are taking SYNTHROID. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar levels and/or the glucose in your urine, as ordered by your doctor, and immediately tell your doctor if there are any changes. If you are taking blood thinners, your blood clotting status should be checked often.

  • Tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking SYNTHROID before any surgery.

  • Tell your doctor if you develop any of the following symptoms: rapid or abnormal heartbeat, chest pain, difficulty catching your breath, leg cramps, headache, nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness, shaking, change in appetite, weight gain or loss, vomiting, diarrhea, increased sweating, difficulty tolerating heat, fever, changes in menstrual periods, swollen red bumps on the skin (hives) or skin rash, or any other unusual medical event.

  • Partial hair loss may occur during the first few months you are taking SYNTHROID.

This is the most important safety information you should know about SYNTHROID. For more information, talk with your doctor.

Click here for full Prescribing Information or go to http://www.rxabbvie.com/pdf/synthroid.pdf.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

SYNTHROID TABLETS ARE A PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION.